Dementia Care: What in the World is a Dementia Village?

Imagine that you’ve been diagnosed with dementia. You’re in the early stages and have the opportunity to choose how you will be cared for in the future.Dementia Care: What in the World is a Dementia Village?

What if your choices were between a home setting or a gated community where you can share an apartment with friends and have the freedom to go shopping whenever you please. Which would you pick? Learn more about an international senior care community revolutionizing dementia care through dementia villages.

A Dementia Village

In the municipality of Weesp, not far from Amsterdam, sits the village of Hogewey. At first glance, it looks like any other village complete with a movie theater, restaurants and shops. There are apartments surrounding a lovely courtyard complete with benches, rippling ponds, trickling fountains and vibrant seasonal flowers that make for a perfect sunny afternoon.

This village, however, is quite unique.

Hogewey is home to 152 men and women living with severe dementia. The community has 23 residential units, each shared by 6-8 residents. Around-the-clock care is provided by 240 “villagers” who are actually trained geriatric nurses and caregivers dressed in street clothes. The staff takes care of everything from cooking meals and planning activities to assisting with bathing, personal care and administering medications. Even the individuals staffing the various village “businesses” are trained in dementia care, to help those with Alzheimer’s go about their day.

Freedom and Security for Residents with Dementia

To ensure resident safety, Hogewey is a secure, but it also allows residents to roam around and explore as much as they wish within its confines. Residents are even encouraged to help with cooking and other household tasks including shopping, in the village grocery store. If they get lost or confused, there is always a “villager” nearby to provide assistance.

Constant reminiscence therapy paired with the freedom allows residents to quell behavioral issues. Still not a believer? Well, consider that the natural decrease in agitation and aggression often results in reduced need for high-powered drugs and medicine.

This model also helps residents remain active and gives them a sense of purpose – something altogether absent in a traditional nursing home environment.

Living a “Normal” LifeDementia Care: What in the World is a Dementia Village?

Some critics oppose the idea of creating this environment, arguing that residents are being misled. However, proponents tout the dementia village as being the most compassionate, kind type of dementia care offered anywhere.

Many experts agree the homelike setting at Hogewey allows residents to live as normal a life as possible, eating dinner family style, visiting with friends, stopping by the barbershop, or going for a walk whenever they wish.

As you can imagine, cost is one of the greatest barriers to making self-contained villages like Hogewey the standard in dementia care. The cost to build the community was slightly over $25 million, $22 million of which was funded by the Dutch government. Residents pay approximately $7,000 monthly, and there is a perpetual waiting list.

The Future of Dementia Care?

Germany and Switzerland have studied Hogewey and may be the next countries to follow suit, creating their own dementia care villages. In the U.S., it is estimated that unless there is a major medical breakthrough, there could be as many as 16 million cases of Alzheimer’s and related dementias by the year 2050.

How wonderful it would be to see this unique care model catch on in the U.S.

What do you think about this concept? Would you consider a community like Hogewey for yourself or a loved one? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

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Please leave your thoughts and comments

  • Pat Price

    This sounds an amazing place. My mother had alzheimers and I cared for her for 6 years while she remained in her retirement apartment. It was always a worry as to where she would end up. Thankfully she died only a few weeks after having to go into 24 hour care. I knew she hated it. We have to find a solution to caring for people with dementia that will keep them engaged as long as possible. Clearly locking them up in a dementia unit attached to a home or hospital is not the best option. It will be interesting to see how many other countries copy this experiment.

    • Ann Napoletan

      I couldn’t agree more, Pat. With numbers growing, something has got to be done… the trick with this is bringing the cost down. And, of course, in America, the government isn’t going throw in almost 90% of the cost to build like the Dutch government did…. Not sure what the answer is, but I’m truly frightened about what the next 10 years hold. Thanks for commenting. ~Ann

  • Mary Johnson

    Let me know if/when there is a push to implement similar communities in the USA! Fabulous solution!

    • Renee Coffey

      Renee, Nice idea, not realistic for most Americans cannot afford that kind of care.

      • cookie

        I agree with you Renee. My mother has mid-stage ALZ and only has $1700 per month from her retirement accounts. There is no way she could live in such a place. She lives with me, and I know t is better than the Assisted Living Facility she was in for a year. In the end, she could not afford the $2500/month to stay there. We also had problems with theft, and the room, although very nice, was not cleaned often. Laundry was not picked up, so she ran out of underwear. There were signs that the care givers used items in her room and bathroom, and although we informed management, nothing ever appeared to remedy the situations.

  • Rebecca

    This is wonderful and I would be first in line,BUT I live in the USA and of course we will get a few of these some day but are will cost 14,000 a month because that is what we do over there only the very wealthy will have this and also !!!And republicans not us who worked hard to earn it.

    • Victoriadiane

      Rebecca, I agree that the cost of living in a “garden spot” like this would be way too expensive for most…however, I believe there are many hard working Republicans who have spent their lives trying to earn enough money to survive retirement as have Democrats, and Independents.

  • Sally Tasker

    Love the idea that it gives the residents a sense of purpose, something that is very absent in the current memory care units in Utah.

  • Judy

    Please bring it to New York

  • The idea is revolutionary and wonderful. Many of the Memory Care Facilities that I have visited recently are set up like a village with common areas, secured parks, soda shops, beauty salons, libraries, and neighborhoods where the residents bedroom/sitting rooms are located. Why not an entire village. One comment: Need a situation for people diagnosed with Young Onset Alzheimer’s. My partner was 55 when diagnosed and now 65. While I hope to keep him at home for years to come, the average age at the facilities I visited was 80+. Also, a concern that these “villages” could turn self serving and greedy for the owners. They would have to meet the same strict standards that individual facilities meet now and be monitored closely.

    • Ann Napoletan

      Excellent points, Michael. Care for early onset patients is definitely a challenge, and the progression is sometimes much faster in EOAD cases. Your partner is very blessed to have you. I wish you both all the very best… ~Ann

  • carol

    This is the ABSOLUTE BEST place I have witnessed My Mother is 95 and is in the middle to late stages. This is EXACTLY where I would want to live The U S is ALWAYS so far behind and like the other gal said IF…if ever even happened they would charge double or triple

    • Ann Napoletan

      Agree. I have been doing a lot of reading about what’s happening in Europe, and in many ways, they have us beat in the areas of advocacy, awareness, and care options. Research is critical to be sure, but we also need to provide the best quality of life for those currently LIVING with ALZ and dementia. I think that is where we often fall short.

  • lisamac

    I have read about Hogewey and it is absolutely where I would go or where I would send my Mother, who is the mid to late stages of alzheimers. This is such a fantastic idea. So much better than a nursing home. The nursing homes in my area, for the most part, are just disgusting. I had to put my Mother in one for about two weeks so that I could find us a place to live. There were three people to a room with a shared bathroom between them and the next room!! Six patients to one bathroom!! The toiled was always clogged, the sink was full of dirty water that would not drain. She received one shower the whole 2 weeks she was there!! I felt awful!! If there was a place in the US like Hogewey we would be there in a “skinny minute”!!

  • Wendy

    I love the concept. My husband has Lewy Body Dementia and is currently in an Assisted Living facility for Dementia Care. There aren’t many in my area that offer the security of a gated and locked yard. This one has a courtyard with a couple tables and chairs. It’s covered with a clear roof allowing residents to go outside and remain dry most of the year.
    They are staffed 24 hours a day with several caregivers and a nurse. They do their best but I’m afraid it’s not the best care. Some will ask the resident to do things with others just bark out an order. Some staff gently lead a person to their room for bed while others grab a wrist and start moving sometimes at speeds the resident is not accustomed to moving.
    The residents are led to bed by 6:00 to 7:00 pm. If the resident wakes up in a couple hours, it’s still daylight, in the summer and if it’s winter they may wake up several times a night and suffer terrifying darkness.
    There are a few higher functioning, early stage patients who would give anything to be able to go for a walk, or go to the corner store to get a candy bar or a beverage. They only have the halls to walk through and they are short.
    The care is not bad but it could be so much better. This “Village” style care center would be a dream come true.

    • Ann Napoletan

      …this makes me very sad… “The care is not bad but it could be so much better.” That’s just simply NOT good enough. These residents deserve to be treated with dignity, respect, compassion, and kindness. Families pay thousands and thousands of dollars to have their loved ones properly cared for, yet the facilities pay aides and carers minimum wage. It’s time we start hiring the right people and paying them what they’re worth. It’s so disheartening.

  • Geriatric worker

    I would most definitely send my parents there or go there myself!!! Anybody would be a fool not too!!

  • WendyCornwall

    This sounds heavenly. I hope more will be built all over the world.

  • Anne Lawrence

    So a dementia village is not the same as regular assisted living in Salt Lake City like http://www.altaridge.com/? Man, I really hope I can avoid this as I get older.

  • Pam Cushenan

    I would move to this type of village if I were diagnosed; it sounds lovely. The cost is comparable to existing LTC fees for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, while the living conditions sound like a 24/7 Disney Land for Dementia. With the growing number of older adults being diagnosed with this condition, it sounds like the way for the U.S. to go, too.

  • wanda

    Would be great, some memory care u its are well on the way to this model. There are b I g waiting lists. A problem is that the article quotes an extremely high monthly cost.

    • allyson

      Wanda, can you give me some names of companies that have memory care units that are moving towards this model? I would really like to be involved with a company like that.

      • lisaca42

        Bethany Home Society in Ripon, California.. I work there. 2 homes with 8 residents per home. Huge, beautiful yard to wander in. I even have a small vegtable garden for the residents to take care of. Yes, they sometimes pick th tometoes while still green, but who cares 🙂 2 caregivers at all times for 8 residents. They can do any household chores they want (with supervision), except cook. They do help prepare some snacks, mixing cookies, cake mixes, measuring ingredients, making banana breads, setting tables, washing sishes, drying dishes, etc…. I have worked for this company for 26 years now and still love my job!

  • Diana

    This sounds wonderful if your rich. What’s going to happen to all the people that can’t afford this. All of us baby boomer are coming up in age I think about this all the time there is know way I could afford that kind of care and my friends say the same think.

  • Barb

    My husband has dementia, early stages. He has been in two nursing homes, care was not good. He was moved down near my son and dil, (nurse) last week. They completely furnished his “apt” as we call it with new recliners, full size bed, tv., etc. They cleaned it themselves even though it was not really dirty. He has his own bathroom. He is getting very good care here which puts my mind at ease. The kids have spent lots of time with him to get him used to this place. Next week they return to work but will stop in every day. I stayed behind to have an estate sale and sell the house, then I will move down there and live with my son and dil.
    There is no way I could pay the price of the village concept. I’m hoping to get some help from Medicaid. Nothing is cheap no matter where you go. But at least here the place is clean and the staff is great. It seems like our government puts the elderly on the bottom of their list. So sad, you work all your life and have to fight to get a little help. I’m selling everything to get money to take care of him. It’s only “stuff” but it was our stuff. The memories are still there.

    • A

      If he is former military from WWII some places offer a “discount” or give monthly money for the caretaking. Check into it.

  • memory

    Wish I had the $ to put my mother in a place like Hogewey, but I don’t, there are more poor people in the world than rich people. What is going to happen to the Baby Boomers when some of them need these services? Wish the gov. would create places like this even if we had to pay, but according to our means, this is need more than helping all these countries that don’t appreciate this country.

    • steve panza

      You have to get Insurance protection early. With the company I deal with, a 50-year old can get the amount of protection described above for $130/month or so. But if you wait until you are 70 (and assuming your health still allows you to qualify), the cost is more like $500/month. But in either scenario, sure beats paying out $7,000/month for care.

      • Gordon

        Sounds good, but when the reality of actually paying out such amounts, these insurance companies end up creating barriers. Paid close to $50K insurance for my mother, and at the end it was a struggle just getting several $100 out of the company for some medical services.

      • Rebecca Price

        Once you have a diagnosis of cognitive impairment, you cannot get insurance. Also, many of these insurance companies have folded due to excessive claims or are simply not wise financial choices. Really have to be careful with your due diligence in evaluating the company.

  • Helena Hadzihajdic

    Brilliant and expiring story, lets hope that we can find such a village in UK very soon

  • Nancy Campion

    Excellent program in Amsterdam, I just retired from working for 10 years as mental health worker with late stage dementia/persistent mental illness case manager,,,,our memory units in the usa are mostly private pay, and few families can afford them, hopefully there will be a way to provide excellent programs to all elders and their families….There are a few similar programs in the state of Oregon, but not as comprehensive as this one,

  • gail

    the USA is so embarrassingly trailing in overall health care – and now hearing of this village – it is left in the dust. in the muck! the gov’t will never be able to help support this concept. all that comes to mind are the billionaires that support pres campaigning…if only they would instead gift – or build – something like this! their name would go down in history as treasured charitable saviors.

  • MJ

    This is a piece of heaven and more people should be aware of this place to see what we can do for the elderly in our hometown. This community gives caregivers a sense of hope for their loved ones and a piece of mind for themselves.

  • Debbie

    Yes that sounds like a wonderful place. I care for my mother of 88 with dementia . But the cost, who could afford that, 7000.00 a month wow. This is the problem with care for our aging parents. Med a care would maybe pay a 1000.00 of that & where do you get the 6000.00 left to pay. For the average person that is not touchable, it a place for the rich! Sad but true

  • Jean Fleming-Kehler

    I am a sixty year old lady who does not have dementia but my brother did and I think it would be wonderful to have this type of system in place in Canada.

  • Dee

    The Dementia Care Village article is very exciting to read, and appears to be absolutely wonderful. And, obviously, it not only would be wonderful for the patient, but so wonderful for the families of the patients. However, how many (what percent of those with dementia could ever afford $7,000/month? I am almost 70 years old and without a doubt, would want to live in that environment if I were ever diagnosed with dementia; but, I could never afford it! I definitely think these facilities should be available for the ones that can afford it.

  • Danielle

    This place sounds wonderful!! I was a caregiver in Nursing Homes for 7 years and had to get out of it because it started burning me out. When I started to be the only one that truly cared for and treated the patients like human beings, it gets difficult. I would love to head something like this up if I had the money. It would be an absolute dream to provide this in the United States. I feel we need it most!

  • Rochelle Bowman

    Sounds great to have our elderly live as normal a life as possible with less drugs needed, bring it to Australia!

  • Leiah Bowden

    I love how utopian models blossom to suit the environment in which they sprout. It surely would be a wonder to be able to offer such an option here in the US. I heartily concur with Ann Napoletan: “It’s time we start hiring the right people and paying them what they’re worth.”
    Let us continue to urge everyone we know, our legislators, the LTC industry in all its aspects, our facility staff and board members, to be aware of how much better LTC can be. It is going to improve and is doing so as we speak, although, as is true with research into every disease we can think of, not in time for those who need it now.
    Thank you for this wonderful piece of news.

  • Aida Zapasnik

    Hi my mother In Laws Mother had dementia and put into a home I noticed she became worse fairly quickly ,she use to say to me wile in the home that she will start to do as the rest of them are doing ,EG) making strange noises, piss all over the floor and smell like they did and left siting alone in their own shit ,the home she was in, was and is a very bad place and should be closed down she died a year later ,then My Mother in-law got it to and I had her moved to the home near were I live ,its a very good home they do lots to help keep them busy But lack of staff is a problem and most times they are just wondering round or just sitting their 🙁 ,that’s why I now volunteer Twice a week and have applied for training been waiting over a year now and am a carer for my 87 year old father In law who has Parkinson ,BUT I think the Dementia people need more to do to keep their minds and body active so your Idea is Wonderful and would help them in keeping their minds and body active, and a little freedom is good ,wouldn’t it be lovely to have a place like that .. God Bless yous

  • Sighs

    Does anyone know anything about Green Houses? They are, as I understand it, an attempt at creating a more homelike atmosphere for dementia patients — or possibly for the elderly in general. I’m actually looking for a place like that for my elderly parents. Any help would be most appreciated1

  • bill Stuehrenberg

    Dementia Village? What about taking care of your loved one yourself, after all they did take care of you the first few years.

    • A

      Sure, you can do that but you can’t 24 hrs. watch your loved one when you find out you have to lock the fridge, lock off the kitchen, lock off the laundry room, block off the stairs, watch them 24 hours & then when you bring someone in to help you pay at least $25 per hour and more if they come at night. They are in a prison in their own home so that is not humane either. If you have a fenced in yard they climb it. It’s like having a toddler who has just learned to run, they fall, they run into things, they get hurt, they put all the toilet paper into the toilet, they eat their poop out of their diaper if they have one second to see it in there when you are trying to change it because they think it is chocolate. If they get access to food without you watching they will hide it & eat it at night where they could choke. They somehow get out of the house when you yourself are trying to use the bathroom so then you start a mad hunt to find them before they get hurt. They will stash food or eat nine yogurts or five bananas in one sitting because they can’t help it & the message from their brain isn’t getting through to tell them they are full or they won’t eat at all. They will eat detergent or toothpaste or anything left around and it’s deadly and scarey and awful and sad and they can’t help it and you try your best and do all you can do but it’s a horrible disease so you are finally stuck and exhausted and you have to get help. Then a family member is mad because you have to put your loved one in a home so they cause all kinds of problems with the caretakers in the home to the point you have to call the police. So, the alternative is a professional home which ranges in cost from $5,000 a month and up to more than $12,000 if you need skilled nursing where you can spend quality time with your loved one and not be exhausted and not be upset or feel so guilty. The caretakers we’ve experienced are angels with low pay and difficult jobs and need better training. They try their best and we are lucky our mom is very sweet and not an angry person but some are very angry and super difficult and scarey. If your loved one is in a wheelchair & in memory care or assisted living they can’t put a seatbelt on to keep them in the chair as it is a “restraint” and most people at that point have scoliosis or something so they can’t sit upright so they lean. So in desperation the caretakers push them up to a table or desk with some activity in hopes they don’t fall out of the wheelchair because like a toddler they will land on their head. The regulations are screwy to say the least. Most of these companies may say they want to give your person dignity and great care but the bottom line is the big issue with them so they cut hours on the staff if their beds aren’t full. So, don’t be critical of others when you haven’t been in their shoes.

      • JPhillips

        Thank you so much for sharing this with others. I am trying to come to grips with what my mother may have to face. I don’t want to be blind to what may happen.

      • dealing with it

        WOW Thank you for sharing all of these truths! We are currently experiencing a lot of what you shared. We have my husbands mother with us in our home. Some are great days and most are very tiring and stressful trying to meet her needs and trying to stay sane ourselves. It changes her life and ours. Some family members are not supportive and don’t give the time of day- they feel the solution is to just put her away. Cannot do that.

        • Chris Gardner

          One thing I learnt as a carer is that everyone’s journey with dementia is different and not everything you read about dementia will happen to you and the person for whom you care. I wish you and all carers and people experiencing dementia all the best. It is a special but extremely challenging period.

      • Ena

        Thank you that was the most honest description I ever heard, and hard to conceive of your own parent, but I appreciate the honesty.

      • jen

        So true and there are all the relentless meetings, form filling and phone calls and if ur like me and have no choice but to work full time just to keep roof over ur own head then you can’t do all the caring yourself but it takes over your life.

      • MiddleChild

        Amen. Not all family members and siblings are willing to sacrifice or even feel empathy for the parent with dementia,or the one left to care for them!
        It’s always the “golden child” left to do the right thing.
        Just try to get through it. Think of it as a gift to be rewarded with good karma,and peace of mind when it’s all over.it’s a tremendous learning curve and an oppurtunity for spiritual growth.
        The parent with Ahlzeimer’s is absolutely helpless and somewhere in the dark recessess of their confused mind, you are there with a little light. They know.

      • L Coronado

        WAY TO PUT IT!! My mother has severe dementia, and wants to be outside all the time, cleaning the yard (whether it needs it or not), till ALL HOURS OF THE NIGHT! We constantly need to drag her in at 2 or 3 in the morning and tell her to go back to bed (at which time she gets angry). And she still tries to “cook” but since her diminished mental capacity doesn’t include “washing her hands” anymore, anything she touches becomes contaminated, and if we don’t catch her in time, lots of food is wasted…leftovers too. As well as constantly turns the stove on and burns pots and pans while boiling water. And she mixes Kool-Aid with her hands. Not to mention, she puts ketchup in mashed potatoes, celery in spaghetti, chocolate syrup on her hot dogs etc, etc…. So yeah, it can be very trying and exhausting 24/7, and you can be a loving and caring individual, but not everybody has 24/7 to devote to this and still maintain a quality of life with the rest of their families :(.

    • Chris Gardner

      This is what I would love to have been able to do for my dear mother for the reasons you have stated and to keep her in the environment with which she was familiar and least stressed…but there came a time when I was physically, emotionally and mentally unable to do this to the end. I think you may be unaware of the demands of caring for someone with dementia…

    • Michelle

      There are no nursing homes nor dementia facilities in Asia. Families takes care of their loved ones and they’ve been managing fine for centuries now 🙂
      We understand the needs of our loved ones, we don’t label them with their disease. If they need to go to the store, we take them there. If they want to cook, we assist them. It’s providing them “their” needs just like a toddler, you provide a safe environment for them which also means that they need constant supervision.
      It’s accepting the fact that your parent is no longer the person that they used to be; this is an adult person in a child-like mind. If you have this kind of mentality, then you’ll treat and manage them differently. Would you leave your child alone in the house?

      • L Coronado

        Would I leave my child alone in the house? NO! But then again, I can chastise, reward, and TEACH my child right from wrong. You can’t do that with an adult. You can’t put them in “timeout” or take away their Nintendo! You really can’t “tell them what to do” because as adults (yes, even with their child-like mentality, most remember they are adults, at least my mother does), they’ll look at you and only get angry. Any “help” we try to give her in the kitchen, she takes as an insult and ultimately mutters under her breath then walks out, and then she’ll refuse to eat because SHE wasn’t allowed to “cook.” She refuses to wash her hands, she refuses to drink anything but soda and syrupy Kool-Aid, she refuses to eat anything unless SHE specifically prepared it (which we’ve already mentioned she doesn’t have the capacity to do anymore). I don’t know how it is in your house, but in my home, my children learn, have rules, restrictions, guidance, consequences, are taught respect, and accept nurturing. Whereas adults with a child-like mind do not live by those same strictures.

  • T.J.

    Sounds like a nice place, however, the cost is astronomical unless you have allot of money. My Mother is in a health and rehab/nursing home – it’s not an “ideal” situation if there is such an “ideal” situation! She’s been there 2 years and has yet to have a roommate that she can communicate with. They don’t seem to pair them up to where they have something in common. She was in therapy 5 days a week, however, is only allotted so many days, when she begins to get better, they cut her to 3 days a week and it will eventually be down to 0 days. When you go from 5 to 3 to 0, you’re going to get immobile again, go figure! However, when she’s admitted to the hospital for pneumonia, etc., her therapy orders go back to 5 days a week when she returns to the facility. I have a bad taste in my mouth for such facilities and hate that she’s in one, however, if I bring her home, she’ll have to have 24/7 care and that cost is astronomical as well. Sad, sad situation.

  • AJ

    It sounds like utopia and great until your loved one has balance issues and is a fall risk or eats things that are inappropriate or deadly or wants to wander all night and day and can’t find their home or room. Or when another resident has some anger issues & targets your loved one because she reminds them of someone so they think they can boss her or push her around. I wonder how they keep someone with later stages of dementia from eating things in the village like soap vs food, etc. or from going into someone else’s room or taking things from someone else because they think it is theirs or sleeping in the wrong room or when they can’t sit still and don’t eat much unless someone sits with them to make sure? Their ratio isn’t really mentioned. I wonder how many actual caretakers are in each of the residences and I don’t mean activities people or cooks or cleaning people. In the US it can be 1:12 or 1:8 or so even for the very nice ones. Then if they don’t max out their rooms they cut the hours of the staff which makes high turnover for the staff. The regulations are the same for assisted living as memory care which needs to be changed in the U.S. as memory care needs a higher staff ratio.

    • Lynn Webster

      I read another article on this, every person there (clerk at the grocery store, the street sweepers, the “neighbors” every single person who is not a patient) is a trained caregiver. If a patient decides to wander, there is someone there. If a patient has an anger issue, someone is there (the treatment style is showing a dramatic reduction in anger related issues)

      • Robert

        It is way too EXPENSIVE! We can’t even afford a nursing home that has a 1:12 ratio. This village will just be for rich people who can pay a private nurse. In nursing homes, families can already feel the discrimination of residents who are assisted by Medicare.

        • Lynn Webster

          That is a valid concern.

        • peter

          mhh with a proper non private health system that would not be that much of an issue, wouldn’t it?

    • Robert

      I agree with you 100%.

  • grandma4cannabis

    The village sounds like a wonderful way for improving the quality of life for anyone that requires any assistance in living life to the fullest. Not only would I prefer a village to a home when I get older for myself, but for all my love ones. I would love to work, manage, have a job in a village where it would help people in such a loving, positive way. Do hope this catches on worldwide so the cost goes down so more could live out their lives with quality.

  • Shannon Clark

    I would like more information on how to start a community like the one above here in the USA. Ann N, Do you have any resources I can read that include services offered or contacts that would be willing to talk to someone wanting to copy their model of care?

  • Kathy Card

    I truly love this model as well. I wonder about some things though, such as having cleaning solutions available in the market. Some of the dementia residents where I have worked would drink these.

  • Thanks to Dr Brave for bringing back my wife,and brought great joy to my family?

    Hello to every one out here, am here to share the unexpected miracle that happened to me three days ago, My name is Jeffrey Dowling,i live in TEXAS,USA.and I`m happily married to a lovely and caring wife,with two kids A very big problem occurred in my family seven months ago,between me and my wife so terrible that she took the case to court for a divorce she said that she never wanted to stay with me again,and that she did not love me anymore So she packed out of my house and made me and my children passed through severe pain. I tried all my possible means to get her back,after much begging,but all to no avail and she confirmed it that she has made her decision,and she never wanted to see me again. So on one evening,as i was coming back from work,i met an old friend of mine who asked of my wife So i explained every thing to her,so she told me that the only way i can get my wife back,is to visit a spell caster,because it has really worked for her too So i never believed in spell,but i had no other choice,than to follow her advice. Then she gave me the email address of the spell caster whom she visited.(bravespellcaster@gmail.com}, So the next morning,i sent a mail to the address she gave to me,and the spell caster assured me that i will get my wife back the next day what an amazing statement!! I never believed,so he spoke with me,and told me everything that i need to do. Then the next morning, So surprisingly, my wife who did not call me for the past seven {7}months,gave me a call to inform me that she was coming back So Amazing!! So that was how she came back that same day,with lots of love and joy,and she apologized for her mistake,and for the pain she caused me and my children. Then from that day,our relationship was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, i will advice you out there to kindly visit the same website http://bravespellcaster.yolasite.com,if you are in any condition like this,or you have any problem related to “bringing your ex back. So thanks to Dr Brave for bringing back my wife,and brought great joy to my family once again.{bravespellcaster@gmail.com} , Thanks.

    Are you passing through any of these problems,

    DO YOU NEED YOUR EX BACK VERY FAST

    DON YOU WANT YOUR LOVER TO LOVE YOU AS NEVER LIKE BEFORE

    ARE YOU SUFFERING FROM A LONG TIME SICKNESS

    ARE YOU FACING FINANCIAL PROBLEMS

    ARE YOU SEEKING FOR A GOOD JOB

    DO YOU WANT TO BECOME A HOUSE OWNER

    ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A FIRST CLASS GRADE

    DO YOU WANT TO COME OUT FIRST IN YOUR EXAMS

    ARE YOU A STAR AND YOU WANT TO BE SO POPULAR TO THE WHOLE WORLD

    DO YOU WANT TO BE RICH

    DO YOU WANT YOUR BUSINESS TO KEEP MOVING

    DO YOU HAVE A COMPANY OF ANY KIND AND YOU WANT IT TO EXPAND

    DO YOU WANT YOUR HUSBAND OR WIFE TO KEEP TO YOUR WORLD

    ARE YOU FACING ANY MARITAL PROBLEMS

    ARE YOU FINDING IT DIFFICULT TO GET PREGNANT FOR YOUR HUSBAND

    ARE YOU EXPERIENCING MISCARRIAGES ANY TIME YOU TAKE IN

    DO YOU WANT TO COMPETE IN ANY LOTTERY GAME

    ARE YOU FACING HARDSHIP

    HAVE YOU BEEN THREATENED BY SOMEONE

    DO YOU WANT TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN ANY THING YOU LAY YOUR HANDS ON

    IS YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER BEHAVING STRANGELY

    ARE YOU FACING WITCH CRAFT MANIPULATIONS

    DO YOU WANT TO CAST A STRONG LOVE SPELL ON YOUR GIRL OR BOY FRIEND

    DO YOU NEED MAGIC POWERS TO DO ANY THING YOU WANT

    ARE YOU FINDING IT DIFFICULT TO CHOOSE A LIFE PARTNER

    DO YOU WANT YOUR PARENTS TO BE PROUD OF YOU

    ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FAILURE AND DISAPPOINTMENT IN ANY THING YOU DO.(ETC)

    If you are facing any of these problems all you just need do is to contact him immediately email ( bravespellcaster@gmail.com )

  • Karen Christensen

    I think this place and idea are great… Maybe it would help with the isolation patienrs feel.. They still feel.. And help with boredom

  • lisaca42
  • Help

    Yes we need these Villages right away in St.Paul,MN. My mom fell at an Assisted Living and broke her Femur they had to drive a nail from the ball joint down into the femur almost to the knee bolt it there and to ball joint and hip. Had to put her in a Nursing Home in the Dementia Ward. Care is 1 Aide to 14. It breaks my heart to see the care they receive. My mom needs a special custom wheel chair for other health issues $8,000! Plus no long term insurance! I am Disabled and can’t care for her. 🙁

  • HOW TO GET YOUR EX LOVER BACK IF YOU BREAK UP WITH HER.

    Hello to every one out here, am here to share the unexpected miracle that happened to me three days ago, My name is Jeffrey Dowling,i live in Texas,USA.and I`m happily married to a lovely and caring wife,with two kids A very big problem occurred in my family seven months ago,between me and my wife so terrible that she took the case to court for a divorce she said that she never wanted to stay with me again,and that she did not love me anymore So she packed out of my house and made me and my children passed through severe pain. I tried all my possible means to get her back,after much begging,but all to no avail and she confirmed it that she has made her decision,and she never wanted to see me again. So on one evening,as i was coming back from work,i met an old friend of mine who asked of my wife So i explained every thing to her,so she told me that the only way i can get my wife back,is to visit a spell caster,because it has really worked for her too So i never believed in spell,but i had no other choice,than to follow her advice. Then she gave me the email address of the spell caster whom she visited.(bravespellcaster@gmail.com}, So the next morning,i sent a mail to the address she gave to me,and the spell caster assured me that i will get my wife back the next day what an amazing statement!! I never believed,so he spoke with me,and told me everything that i need to do. Then the next morning, So surprisingly, my wife who did not call me for the past seven {7}months,gave me a call to inform me that she was coming back So Amazing!! So that was how she came back that same day,with lots of love and joy,and she apologized for her mistake,and for the pain she caused me and my children. Then from that day,our relationship was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, i will advice you out there to kindly visit the same Website: http://enchantedscents.tripod.com/lovespell/,if you are in any condition like this,or you have any problem related to “bringing your ex back. So thanks to Dr Brave for bringing back my wife,and brought great joy to my family once again.{bravespellcaster@gmail.com} , Thanks.

  • How to get back your ex husband, wife, girlfriend, or boyfriend,

    Hello to every one out here, am here to share the unexpected miracle that happened to me three days ago, My name is Jeffrey Dowling,i live in Texas,USA.and I`m happily married to a lovely and caring wife,with two kids A very big problem occurred in my family seven months ago,between me and my wife so terrible that she took the case to court for a divorce she said that she never wanted to stay with me again,and that she did not love me anymore So she packed out of my house and made me and my children passed through severe pain. I tried all my possible means to get her back,after much begging,but all to no avail and she confirmed it that she has made her decision,and she never wanted to see me again. So on one evening,as i was coming back from work,i met an old friend of mine who asked of my wife So i explained every thing to her,so she told me that the only way i can get my wife back,is to visit a spell caster,because it has really worked for her too So i never believed in spell,but i had no other choice,than to follow her advice. Then she gave me the email address of the spell caster whom she visited.(bravespellcaster@gmail.com}, So the next morning,i sent a mail to the address she gave to me,and the spell caster assured me that i will get my wife back the next day what an amazing statement!! I never believed,so he spoke with me,and told me everything that i need to do. Then the next morning, So surprisingly, my wife who did not call me for the past seven {7}months,gave me a call to inform me that she was coming back So Amazing!! So that was how she came back that same day,with lots of love and joy,and she apologized for her mistake,and for the pain she caused me and my children. Then from that day,our relationship was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, was now stronger than how it were before,by the help of a spell caster . So, i will advice you out there to kindly visit the same Website: http://enchantedscents.tripod.com/lovespell/,if you are in any condition like this,or you have any problem related to “bringing your ex back. So thanks to Dr Brave for bringing back my wife,and brought great joy to my family once again.{bravespellcaster@gmail.com}
    (`’•.¸(` ‘•. ¸* ¸.•’´)¸.•’´)..

    «´ Thanks to Dr Brave ¨`»

    ..(¸. •’´(¸.•’´ * `’•.¸)`’•.¸ )..”

  • Susan Criscuolo

    I am thrilled to know that someone, somewhere created a setting for dementia victims where they can live with dignity, independence, stimulation and measured freedom. The American system of providing the minimum in care, amount of care-givers, activities, and quality of food
    is unacceptable. My parents both passed away last year at 97 and 96, with dementia. I kept them in their home as long s possible with 24 hour care. For my mom’s safety, we were forced to move them into a lock down unit in an assisted living and ultimately, a nursing home. My brother and I were there constantly and since their location was considered “the best of the worst”, I shudder to think of what goes on in other institutions. Currently the choice of handing dementia problems lack of sleep and/or aggression is drugs, clearly there is a better way and I believe Hogewey has found it. I applaud this model and would like to become an active participant in creating this style dementia village in the USA. Yes, there are financial obstacles, but we find money for everything else, our geriatric population deserve to be properly and optimally cared for, and they are not.

  • Chris Gardner

    Just watched this presentation. We need to be doing much better for people who are living with dementia and the carers!

  • JacquieR

    As a caregiver myself, I find this concept to be an excellent idea. Most of my residents get frustrated with themselves because they cannot fully express their needs and/or they can’t do their day-to-day activities like they used to. Not only does this allow the residents’ to maintain a sense of dignity and normalcy, but it allows the caretakers to be able to truly focus on the resident. Having to take care of 32+ beds with residents who have dementia or Alzheimer’s can be overwhelming for both resident and caretaker and I believe by utilizing this approach, everybody wins in some sort of way. I hope this concept comes to the United States sooner rather than later.

  • A more for Brenda

    My Mum Brenda has had dementia now for approximately 5 years she is in her early 70’s and is mainly happy.

    Unfortunately Mum could no longer stay at home with my Dad as she would not let anyone change her and got very distressed when family or careers attempted. The last 5 months Mum’s home has been a NHS assessment unit where the care is mainly very good, however Mum is very active and loves music and to dance (one of her favourite songs is Amore’ by Dean Martin and she remembers most of the words) however I feel her needs are overlooked due to busy schedules, shortage of staff with the right skills and lack of compassion. Also why has a proper home not been found for my Mum to move to at this stage – we are told that a care home will not take her until she stops getting distressed and ocassionally lashing out when staff try to wash, change and dress her (I ask you how would you feel if strangers took your clothes off)?

    On the news today there was mention of funding research into treating symptoms of Dementia. I feel this a step forward however I genuine belief the goverment should first concentrate on providing more funding for Dementia care, training and carers. The place my Mum in is not appropriate it is very institutionalised – no change to the images seen years ago in the film One Flew Over a Cuckoos Nest.

    The Dementia Village in Holland is a brilliant example of how people should be cared for with this condition and I question why the goverment is not funding similar projects in the UK? I know my Mum would be happy wondering around a closed gated village like this.
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogewey#Layout

    http://www.detail-online.com/architecture/topics/dementia-village-de-hogeweyk-in-weesp-019624.html

  • robert

    Way too EXPENSIVE! This is only for the rich. You think MEDICAID will pay for that? Residents with fall and severe behavioural issues need 1:1 care which would cost a LOT of money.

  • I keep thinking this would be an ideal repurposing for the many defunct and declining shopping malls across the country before they get demolished. A whole generation that came of age and spent much of their young adulthood in malls is now approaching senescence, and as many of them also regress to an earlier state of mind, where better to have them live than in an adaptation of the “native environment” of their youth?

  • Ellen

    Oh my gosh, have just come across the amazing site. What a wonderful concept, if only other countries were so innovative and driven as the Dutch government..obviously leaders in dementia care. I am in Australia and I could not imagine the Australian government funding such a facility, let alone private organisations. The residents have a purpose in each and every day…wonderful, wonderful…the rest of the world can only wish…hats off to you all

  • Sharon

    I would sell my home and happily use the money to allow my loved one to live their final years in this type environment. It seems so much more dignified that the tiny hospital like rooms normally used to ‘house’ dementia patients.

  • SHINJI MATSUKI

    I love this idea and keep demandin it will happen in nearby in my country. It may depend upon govermnet schem to fund for such concepts and therefore it will not be coming true soon in Japan which is my country. I believe that dementia is the disease that ocuur cross-curtualy and solution in other country may save problems in another country. I wish I could visit Holland to see how it is so that I can study and feel SOMTHING apply to loval criteria. SHIINJI MATSUKI (JAPAN)

  • Are there any dementia village care centers in the Battle Creek, MI area??

  • No name

    It will be 3 yrs. now since mom’s “emergency admission” (advancing dementia) to a Mennonite facility in Canada. She is ambulatory, was pushed (by another resident) & fell, injuring (but thankfully, not breaking) her leg. It was only her first week there from home. I “strongly” advocated for her to be moved to a less violent unit & succeeded. However, now mom herself can get ornery during her “down times” & she will push staff away & raise her fist (she’s less than 5″ tall & petite). First thing they want to do is use sedatives. Once again, I’ve strongly advocated for non-pharmacological therapies. Standing alone against this “tide” is draining & frustrating. The doctor there refuses anything at all that is “naturopathic” in nature.
    I go in & take her out for walks in the neighbourhood & her mood changes 360~ to happy & compliant after our walks. She loves nature & there are nature trails nearby we visit. I imagine a place like the one mentioned here, where the dementia resident could be kept busy & active & all staff would use alternative methods in dealing with “triggers” & agitated behaviours.

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